6 Sleep Myths You Should Stop Believing

Let’s get rid of stereotypes once and for all.

It’s time to remind you that about a third of our lives are devoted to sleep, but it so happens that we remember almost nothing from there. Basically, these daily eight hours of oblivion are shrouded in mystery and multiple stereotypes that have no scientific basis. Someone somewhere told us something, we remembered it and went on to spread disinformation further.

However, sooner or later we all need to face the truth. That is why we decided to debunk some of the main stereotypes about sleep, based on proven facts.

MYTH #1: WE ALL SNORE, AND THAT’S OKAY.

Perhaps light snoring can overtake each of us – this is normal. But if we are talking about a solid snoring that can be heard behind the wall, this is not normal. According to experts from the National Sleep Foundation (USA), if a person snores quite loudly for more than three days a week, he needs to see a doctor.

This may be evidence of obstructive sleep apnea, especially if during the next day the person feels tired, drowsy and overwhelmed.

MYTH #2: ALCOHOL IS AN EFFECTIVE SLEEP AID.

Sometimes some alcohol can actually make us sleepy and even help us fall asleep faster, but there is a downside to this effect. According to numerous studies, alcohol shortens the so-called REM phase – the period during which we dream and restore our strength. Because of this, a few glasses of wine or something stronger before bed can make us more tired the next day.

MYTH #3: WE CAN TRAIN OURSELVES TO SLEEP FOR FIVE HOURS IF WE TRY.

Perhaps this is one of the most common misconceptions that it is time to part with. We all know that for a healthy sleep, an adult needs from seven to nine hours – depending on the characteristics of the body, lifestyle, and so on. Of course, there are rare exceptions for which the optimal sleep time would be five hours – but these are really very rare cases.

So those who somehow get five hours of sleep a day and say they feel great are people who are deluding themselves, either those who have insomnia or the chosen ones who are lucky enough to regenerate in such a short time.

MYTH #4: SOME PEOPLE NEVER DREAM.

According to statistics, a person dreams of four to six separate stories per night. However, it happens that when we wake up, we cannot remember a single one. The point here is that our brain erases all the dreams we have seen from memory quite well. So, most likely, those people who say that they don’t dream anything just don’t remember it.

MYTH #5: EVENING WORKOUTS INTERFERE WITH SLEEP.

In fact, exercise improves the quality of sleep, so it’s not a hindrance in and of itself. However, large meals after such workouts (which is not uncommon) can just prevent us from falling asleep on time. Take a closer look at what you do in the evening after your workout. You may be stimulating your body, making it harder to fall asleep.

MYTH #6: YOU CAN NOT WAKE UP A SLEEPWALKER WHILE HE IS SLEEPWALKING.

Surely each of us has repeatedly heard that it is better not to wake up sleepwalkers during sleep, otherwise this can lead to some terrible and irreparable consequences. But it’s not. Firstly, sleepwalkers are not so easy to wake up, which is an interesting feature of sleepwalking, and secondly, if you do succeed, they will simply be overwhelmed and annoyed. So, if you have recorded a case of sleepwalking, it is better to just take the person back to bed.